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The QCY Q29 Pro is touted as the more affordable alternative to the likes of the Samsung Gear Icon X, and the Sony WF-1000X.

With an easy to use multi-function button, Bluetooth 4.2 that enables faster transmission and a larger packet capacity (better sound, in short), it caters to people who want to enjoy their music on the go without having to worry about dangling and tangling wires, while also being able to answer calls with a press of a button.

QCY Q29 Pro specs:

Battery: 43mAh, 220mAh on Carrying Case
Bluetooth Version: 4.2
Bluetooth profile: HFP, HSP, A2DP, AVRCP
Operation range: 10m
Talk time: 3 hrs

Packaging

Design and Build Quality

In terms of design, the Q29 Pro slightly resembles the Samsung Gear IconX, but retains its own identity with a clear plastic button on both sides with some branding. While composed mostly of plastic and a rubbery material, it does look like it will survive a hard fall or two.

The headset comes with a carrying case which also doubles as a mobile charger. All you need to do is place the buds on their corresponding sides, close the lid, and you’re good to go.

Ease of Use

The Q29 Pro is composed of two oval-shaped buds that can be used in a mono or stereo setup. That means you can use both, or just one of them, whichever you prefer.

Setting up the buds for the first time can be quite tricky, but what i’ll advise you to do, is read the manual. Yes, everything is in there. You just have to follow it.

After initial setup, everything should be a breeze on your next use. Just turn on both buds by pressing the QCY button for a few seconds, connect to one side via Bluetooth, and you’re all set.

Operating the headset is easy. Double tap to skip tracks, one tap to play, pause, answer and end calls. Tapping and holding the button on either side will power off the headset.

Sound Quality and Performance

For my music test, I’ll be using my daily drivers, an ASUS Zenfone 3 and a Vivo V7. All songs will be played via Spotify at Extreme Quality.

As a disclaimer, this part of the review is based off my own preferences to sound quality. Yours may of course differ.

Lows: If you’re looking for bass, the Q29 Pro isn’t for you. It’s not that there’s no bass, it’s just that it’s not really evident. In Ne-Yo’s Go On Girl, you can definitely hear the thumping beat at the lower end of the spectrum, it gives enough to give some energy to the song, but not enough for you to go headbanging.

Mids: If there’s a part of the sound signature that I like, it’s this one. The vocals in 98°’s I Do (Cherish You) are presented so sweetly with just the right amount of clarity such that every “s” in the lyrics sound well articulated, though in some songs like The Corrs’ Radio, it kind of sounds like there’s a tube between the vocalist and the microphone.

Highs: The highs on the Q29 Pro aren’t piercing, but just enough that you don’t get bored with the song. In Evan and Jaron’s Crazy for this Girl, you can clearly hear the percussion instruments in the background, not being drowned by the vocals.

Soundstage: The Q29 Pro doesn’t have a very wide soundstage, but rather presents the sound as if you’re just in a room with the band performing front you.

Details: Some headphones can present very minute details, like an instrument that you thought wasn’t there, or perhaps a 1 second almost-silent piano sound during the chorus. The Q29 isn’t that unfortunately, but not to the point that the sound seems lacking.

Volume: The Q29 Pro’s max volume should be enough for a daily commute. The  problem is, you’ll have to be at max volume all the time if you’re outside. Of course, this may vary with the device you’re using. But with my ASUS Zenfone 3, any level less than was just not loud enough.

Connectivity: For the good sound that it produces, I did encounter occasional cuts in the audio, even when I was very close to the source. Testing the maximum distance for good sound quality, I found out that at around 10 meters, the sound begins to cut off from one side. Any more, and it totally disconnects from the source. Take note that this test was done with walls in between, so you may be able to go farther in an open area.

Isolation and Comfort

The medium tips that come attached to the Q29 Pro should fit most people. They also offer a good seal that’s able to block off most of the outside noise. Of course, that doesn’t apply when you’re in a tricycle or an ordinary bus, but it’s more than enough for you to enjoy the music without much distraction.

The Q29 Pro is surprisingly comfortable to wear. With the medium tips on, I could listen to the headset for hours without problems. In fact, it almost felt like I wasn’t wearing them at all.

Call Quality

More than just for playing music, the Q29 Pro also has a built-in microphone for making and answering calls. Call quality was superb, with the voice coming across loud and clear on both ends. Of course, the quality may degrade depending on how far you are from your phone.

Battery Life

On continuous use at around 80% volume, the headset lasted for around 4 hours on a single charge – quite decent for something so small. Fortunately, it only takes about an hour to charge it back to full.

Verdict

The QCY QC29 Pro is a handy accessory for people who want to enjoy their music on the go, minus the cables. It’s well built, comfy, easy to use, and the sound itself is decent enough for most genres. The carrying case that doubles as a mobile charger also adds convenience.

On the flipside, there are instances wherein the audio gets cut off depending on what device you’re using, even when you’re near the source. You can also easily lose one of the buds (or even both of them) if you’re not careful about your stuff. Lastly, the battery can only last for a trip to the office.

For all the good things that it boasts, the occasional loss of sound on one side, though only for a second or two, sort of ruins the experience. I personally wouldn’t recommend it for this reason alone.

The Good

  • Easy to operate
  • Buds can be used in Stereo and Mono
  • Carrying case acts as a mobile charger
  • Decent sound quality that suits most genres

The Not So Good

  • Occasional cut-off in sound
  • Short battery life

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