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Earlier, we wrote a gaming performance comparison between the Samsung Galaxy A50 and the OPPO F11 – two mid-range phones which offer astonishing value for money.

f11 vs a50 cameraBut we aren’t stopping there. We actually have a second comparison between the two devices. This time, we’ll compare the devices’ camera performance with sample shots, each tackling a different aspect. Will the Galaxy A50’s triple rear cameras prevail? or will the F11’s 48MP main camera hold its ground? let’s start!

Tale of the Tape

The Samsung Galaxy A50 sports a triple rear camera system – A 25MP main camera, an 8MP wide-angle shooter, and a 5MP depth sensor. The OPPO F11 on the other hand, sticks to two shooters, but makes it up with a 48MP main camera, also with a 5MP secondary snapper. Up front, It’s 25MP and 16MP for the A50 and F11 respectively.

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Both devices’ optics are bolstered by a ton of other features, such as Live Focus and Scene Optimizer for the A50, and Chroma Boost and Night Mode for the F11.

Camera Tests

Note: All shots taken as “point and shoot” – no additional features (Chroma Boost, Night Mode, Etc. were used). 

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For our first image, colors on the photo taken by the Galaxy A50 looks slightly more natural than the enhanced reds on the F11’s shot. Both were able to capture a good amount of detail and sharpness.

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Here’s an indoor shot in a mall. As you’ll notice, the F11 tends to enhance the yellows and blues, while the A50 keeps a more natural tone.

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Next up, a shot of a plant in less than ideal lighting. This time, I prefer the brighter and more lively photo taken by the F11. Details on both are fairly decent, though there are hints of over processing on the edges.

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Here’s a shot of some structures with HDR turned ON for both devices. The F11 once again shows enhanced colors, which are very noticeable especially on the walls. The A50 clearly captures the sharper image, which is evident on the terrace and trees.

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Here’s a photo of a plant in our home garden. While detail and sharpness, even the depth of field is decent on both, I’d have to go with the more natural colors on the F11.

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This was supposed to be a test of color accuracy, in which the F11 did a better job. It was also able to capture some details that the A50 wasn’t able to, such as the less-painted areas on the orange stick, and the tiny details on the Blue triangle.

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In this low-light selfie with an external light source, both the F11 and Galaxy A50 are able to capture a decent amount of detail on the face, though there’s a hint of some overprocessing in the background for the former. The photo taken by the F11 also seems to be a little out of focus, though I’m quite sure it was.

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For a depth of field test, this shot was taken with the Galaxy A50 on Live Focus mode, and the F11 on Portrait Mode. The thing is, for the latter, you’ll need to be a bit further than usual from the subject for the effect to kick in.  In terms of the effect itself, the A50 is able to blur out that background more, with good edge detection.

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In this low-light shot, the Galaxy A50 shows less control of the light source (see that glaring effect?), while the F11 is able to tame it down.

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In this selfie, the both devices were able to churn out a decent depth of field effect, but the F11 falls short on edge-detection especially on the cheeks. The A50 on the other hand, is able to accurately blur that area.

Verdict

Well, it isn’t a total sweep, but the Galaxy A50 does tend to take slightly better photos in most areas. It’s not as if the F11 is that far behind though, in fact, it can go toe to toe with the former at times. That’s considering It’s a more affordable device.

To be honest, the A50 and F11 can trade punches all day as far as features are concerned. The F11 for example may not have a dedicated wide-angle camera, but it does have a dedicated Night Mode, which isn’t present on the A50 (which has a wide-angle lens).

The A50’s Live Focus feature also lets you adjust the intensity of the depth of field effect, whereas on the F11, you’ll be the one to determine a rectangular or circular area which will be focused, and the rest will be blurred.

Those and many more. So, which phone will we recommend for photography? well, both are great for daylight shots. If you love taking portraits or photos of landscapes, the A50’s Live Focus feature and dedicated wide-angle lens make it a better choice. If however, you love to take Night Shots, the F11’s Night Mode makes it an attractive offer, and It’s PhP2,000 cheaper too.

Emman has been writing technical and feature articles since 2010. Prior to this, he became one of the instructors at Asia Pacific College in 2008, and eventually landed a job as Business Analyst and Technical Writer at Integrated Open Source Solutions for almost 3 years.