Last night, it was very coincidental that I mentioned Steve Jobs to my wife. We were talking about the probable reasons why Apple decided to launch the iPhone 4S rather than the iPhone 5. From a business standpoint, Apple was probably trying to lure current iPhone 3GS users to upgrade. But from an investment standpoint, Apple may have also thought the disappointment of certain Apple shareholders and future investors may drag its stocks down (not to the extreme level), and try to recover (extremely, this time) by the time they launch the iPad 3 in March 2012, followed by the iPhone 5 in June 2012. Then I told my wife that it would be ideal that Steve Jobs would make the announcement of both devices to create and post significant mark to the total view and value of Apple, unless he dies before the year ends. And then, the unfortunate event happened this morning.

This morning, one of our time’s greatest thinkers, artists and inventors, Steve Jobs, died from pancreatic cancer. He battled cancer for more than 7 years, and died at the age of 56.

Steve Jobs Dies of Pancreatic Cancer

I was waiting for my wife on my car this morning when I saw the news that Steve died. Coincidentally, I was then flicking my Twitter feeds on my iPhone. It was not just the thought that it would be too odd if I won’t be affected by the news because I’m a total fanboy, but it was the connection he created with me through the phone I’m using. It was really a sad day for me; I thought it was just apt for me to offer this day for him and “live each day as if it’s my last” – just like what he said.

I’ve been a total Steve Jobs fan boy since the launch of the first iPhone at an event in San Francisco in 2007. The iPhone, which eventually changed the way mobile phones look like, was one of his many inventions. But more than being an innovator and inventor, Steve is (and will always be) my model public speaker. During his keynote speeches and product announcements, he talked very smoothly and “magically” with a lot of sense. His famous “one more thing” added thrill to every WWDCs I watched. He suspended my emotions and jolted it with his tame voice while saying, “Isn’t it great? This is by far the best product we’ve created.”

steve jobs mosaic

The big question for me remains – What Would the World Do Without Steve Jobs?

Some may have reacted indifferently towards Apple’s new product, the iPhone 4S, during its launch yesterday (oddly a day before Steve’s demise). For a lot of iPhone 5 hopefuls, they thought that the iPhone 4S is an unworthy upgrade from the iPhone 4. Many believed though, especially the iPhone 3GS users, thought that the iPhone 4S is really made for them just in time after their 2-year standard telco contract. The latter, I believe is basically the foremost reason why Apple created the iPhone 4S; and the secondary reason, which my brother jokingly said, is that the 4S also stands for 4Steve – an early (nagmiridang) honor to the great innovator and the one who conceptualized the iPhone.

What would Apple do now? Uncle Tim Cook, Apple’s new CEO, has big shoes to fill. The world expects a lot from Steve’s predecessor. The world needs more innovations from Tim because, as Steve said, “Innovation is what distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” As one of the world’s valuable company and the leader in mobile computing and consumer electronics, revolutionary, radical and more magical things are expected from Apple. I am more excited than worried to see the answer to my question. How about you?

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